Australian Billboard Liberation Sleeper Cell Strikes

September 29th, 2008by MiltonRandKalman

Australia before

Australia after

A small group of people from the outskirts of Sydney Australia, lead by an newly inspired billboard liberator, has recently formed with the intention to help the public question the use of advertising in public spaces.

The group’s leader, Robert Brown told us of the motivation of the group, free street art. “It is our belief that public art should not be illegal and forced to stay behind gallery doors, but it should be displayed in public spaces and used as a method to encourage people to question the society they reside and it’s morals.”

Discussing recent activity Brown stated that “After several successful postings on a local church billboard questioning their message of heaven or hell. A decision was made that a bigger audience with a larger target was required.”

When asked about the latest billboard Brown commented, “After seeing a billboard with such an open and inviting message, it was only a matter of time before we improved it.”

Why use the Prime Minister as the victim?
“The selection of the victim was a grueling process, as it was difficult to choose a person who will annoy a lot of people, while also bring great satisfaction to many others. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd was used as he was currently receiving a lot of media attention for going to New York, to discuss the financial crisis. We also wanted to make it clear that our organisation will not withhold from questioning any form of society no matter how they are perceived in society.” Robert Brown.

What Moral is your work questioning?
“This particular work is of more interpretive nature, and is aimed at helping the public see the lighter side of politics, and to remove themselves from a stance of love or hate towards their country’s political leader, but a feeling of respect, which will help us to become a more tolerable country.” Brown.

Is there any future activities planned for the group?

“Yes. The group is constantly working on smaller projects, but future large scale activities will be focused on the use of billboards for alcohol advertisement, which we find quite contradictory with governmental interventions for this country’s aboriginal populations in central Australia.”